Theranostics 2019; 9(25):7872-7888. doi:10.7150/thno.37373

Review

Quantitative Proteomics and Metabolomics Reveal Biomarkers of Disease as Potential Immunotherapy Targets and Indicators of Therapeutic Efficacy

Melanie A. MacMullan1*, Zachary S. Dunn1*, Nicholas A. Graham1, Lili Yang2,3, Pin Wang1,4,5✉

1. Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
2. Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, California
3. Eli & Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, Los Angeles, California
4. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
5. Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
*These authors contributed equally to this work.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). See http://ivyspring.com/terms for full terms and conditions.
Citation:
MacMullan MA, Dunn ZS, Graham NA, Yang L, Wang P. Quantitative Proteomics and Metabolomics Reveal Biomarkers of Disease as Potential Immunotherapy Targets and Indicators of Therapeutic Efficacy. Theranostics 2019; 9(25):7872-7888. doi:10.7150/thno.37373. Available from https://www.thno.org/v09p7872.htm

File import instruction

Abstract

Quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) continues to deepen our understanding of the immune system, quickly becoming the gold standard for obtaining high-throughput, quantitative data on biomolecules. The development of targeted and multiplexed assays for biomarker quantification makes MS an attractive tool both for diagnosing diseases and for quantifying the effects of immunotherapeutics. Because of its accuracy, the use of MS for identifying biomarkers of disease reduces the potential for misdiagnosis and overtreatment. Advances in workflows for sample processing have drastically reduced processing time and complexities due to sample preparation, making MS a more accessible technology. In this review, we present how recent developments in proteomics and metabolomics make MS an essential component of enhancing and monitoring the efficacy of immunotherapeutic treatments.

Keywords: Quantitative mass spectrometry, immunotherapy targets, proteomics, metabolomics